June 12, 2018 12:40 PM

Jim Carrey isn’t a fan of President Donald Trump‘s latest move.

In his latest politically charged illustration, Carrey depicted North Korean leader Kim Jong Un wearing a costume missile with the words, “I starved my people to make this missile,” written in bold red letters. The cartoon also shows Trump holding a microphone up to Kim’s mouth, who is holding a sign that says, “Little Rocket Man.” Trump has called Kim by the title in various tweets.

The Ace Ventura actor, 56, who picked up painting about six years ago, has been demonstrating his political beliefs through his artwork. Carrey rarely explicitly names the subjects of his portraits but many appear to be prominent political figures.

The cartoon comes after Trump and Kim came together for a historic first meeting on Tuesday morning in Singapore, late Monday night in the U.S. Live footage and photos from Singapore’s Sentosa Island showed Trump, 71, and Kim, whom experts believe to be 33, shaking hands at the Capella Hotel, marking the first time that a sitting U.S. president and a North Korean leader have met.

Over the past couple years, Carrey has taken to social media to share some of his pieces, which have generated praise, condemnation and everything in between.

The actor first shared a piece of Trump-related artwork in Aug. 2017, tweeting a sketch depicting the president on a sinking ship labeled “USS Trump.” His boat is shown dipping into a literal sea of lies. “WHAT WILL IT TAKE for the GOP to throw this madman overboard? HOW LOW MUST WE SINK before REPS become patriotic?” he captioned.

And in another particularly controversial sketch, Carrey depicted the president appearing to kiss the exposed rear-end of a grinning Russian President Vladimir Putin. “They bailed him out, set him up and made him their stooge. With Trump in the WH, Putin may win the 3rd World War without firing a shot,” Carrey wrote, adding the caption “#PuckerUpPOTUS.”

Carrey spoke about his love for painting in a 2017 documentary short called I Needed Color.

“You can tell what I love by the color of the paintings,” he said in the video, posted to Vimeo. “You can tell my inner life by the darkness in some of them and you can tell what I want from the brightness in some of them.”

The actor went on to reveal that he began to turn toward painting more and more to express himself when he found himself looking for a way to deal with his emotions during a particularly difficult time in his life.

“I sketched all the time, but I didn’t do a lot of painting,” he said in the video. “Suddenly, 6 years ago, at a time when I was trying to heal a broken heart, I decided, ‘Well, maybe I’ll paint.’

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